Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
's governors met with president obama today about what they need to see in a fiscal cliff deal. we talk with delaware governor jack markell. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. a coalition of the nation's top c.e.o.s is feeling pessimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal. the group's leader joins us, maya macguinneas. >> tom: and luxury fashion meets the mass market. who wins with target's pairing with neiman marcus? >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there wasn't much obvious ground given today between president obama and congressional republicans in the effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in january. president obama repeated his pledge he's open to new ideas, but is holding firm on his call for higher taxes on top income earners, something missing from the g.o.p. plan. with just three weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. with time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> i
today to persuade president obama and congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. with just 33 days left to nail down a deal, c.e.o.s made the rounds to explain to lawmakers that because of cliff gridlock, they're holding back on hiring and spending. as darren gersh reports, c.e.o.s weren't the only ones campaigning hard today. >> reporter: the president and republicans focused today on staging events designed to pressure the other side. the president called on americans to tweet, facebook and call members of congress to tell them to pass tax cuts for everyone making less that $250,000 a year. >> 97% of small businesses would not see their income tax go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. >> reporter: the speaker dismissed a call from a fellow republican to give the president what he wants, saying it's not good economics to raise tax rates on small businesses. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. it's as simple as that, and the pr
. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it's... it's... was not a serious proposal. and so, right now, we're almost nowhere. >> reporter:
more than 11,000 employees. president obama warned republicans not to try linking the fiscal cliff negotiations to an increase in the federal debt ceiling early next year. timothy geithner says the administration absolutely it prepared to let the economy go over the fiscal cliff unless the republicans accept higher tax rates on the healthy. and the southern philippines struggled to recover from a typhoon that killed nearly 300 people. and what does a day in the life of public buses, trains and subways look like? the answer is part of our science roundup online. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: the image resembles a lite-bright time lapse. find those pictures and our conversation with a software developer who set out to visualize the 24-hour cycle of urban public transit systems. that's on our homepage. an international telecommunications conference in dubai aims to set new rules for the internet. what's at stake? we take a look in the rundown. and on making sense, economics correspondent paul solman argues both sides of the capital gains tax debate. all that and mo
america? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if t
be good. >> we're going towards the cliff. >> and so what happened is the election happened. obama wins. clearly he ran on raising tax or raising revenue from the top 2%. center piece. republicans are not stupid. they sort of understand that. so they went through a process the day after boehner said revenues but not rates, and some began to drift over, okay, rates, so you have had movement, until friday or yesterday, thursday, when tim geithner goes up there and delivers an ultimatum which is a chest thumping stick in the eye to the republicans. and all the migration suddenly stops and suddenly they get outraged apt are. and so they are back, they are going back to where grover norquist wants them to be because they are outraged because they feel they have been insulted is, that this is not a negotiation t a war. i think what had yesterday from the administration was a bit of negotiation incompetence because they pushed us, the psychological process the republicans were going through, which they have to go through has to be has been pushed way back. >> where do you think we are. >> i'm
." welcome back. >> thank you. >> brown: after the election, it's all fiscal cliff, right? let's talk about how the white house is using social media and online efforts on that issue. >> it's as if this massive social media machine that propelled barack obama into office never stopped moving. and you found that at the white house today where he gave a speech talking about the fiscal cliff, introducing the hashtag-- which is a way of grouping something-- my2k, which is a playoff of waoeubgt, ther of y2. he's saying if you don't do something you are going to have to pay as middle-class taxpayers, $2,000 allegedly. >> if congress doesn't stop the automatic tax hikes. >> brown: but this was in the context of a whole week where he's making his play, right? but doing it online? >> it's fascinating with the president of the united states building it around a twitter campaign, we've come to take that for granted but i did a little search for this my2k. on twitter. barack obama comes up second. you know what comes up first? the conservative heritage foundation which bought a promoted tweet, which me
if we go over the cliff. it's not as if we're talking about a situation in which president obama gets everything he wants. i'm not sure. what we want is the least bad outcome for the u.s. economy. and the u.s. long-term fiscal outlook that we can get. i don't think that balance is what we're seeking. what we're seeking is is let's try not to mess up this situation even more than it already is mess up. >> ifill: do you agree with erskine bowles who told us where we are right now resembles theater? >> i think it's a little bit more than that. i think that there is a much deeper partisan divide. i think erskine bowles, bless his mart heart, still wants to believe we live in the washington of 20 or 30 years ago where reasonable men could ghettoing and make sensible deals. i don't think we're in that washington anymore. i think this is going to be... i don't think there's going to be much of a deal. i think there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome which hopefully won't be too bad. but the idea that we're actually going to have a guy shaking his hands and everybody feeling
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8